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Virtual Tellers – Two Managers Tell Us How They Keep Branches Personal

BY KAITLIN MORRISON

Virtual teller platforms may offer opportunities for credit unions to extend their reach but they also pose the risk of impersonality. How can you take advantage of all this technology has to offer without alienating your members? Listen is as two CU branch managers share their top three secrets to success.

Virtual teller technology is reshaping many credit union branches across the country and the world. A virtual teller platform allows members to interact with a remote, live person to conduct their banking transactions. This capability allows tellers to be offsite,  in a centralized location for multiple branches or elsewhere. For branch managers, it represents another tool to connect with members and improve their experiences at their credit unions.

Rather than alienating your members with such technology, you can implement it in the right way and actually enhance the experience at your branch. Your branch staff and other support staff are already the backbone of your credit union. When you add new technology, giving them the starring role will help make the transition successful for everyone.

For this month’s column, we asked two credit unions to share with us how they successfully use this technology and still maintain the quality, personal connection members crave when they visit physical branches. Their answers show how your branch can add a personal touch and still extend your reach through the power of virtual tellers.

Learn from their tech tips and help your members have a top-notch experience with technology at your branch.

Tech Tip #1: Plan for the learning curve by engaging your staff and your members. Choose to deliberately make the technology more human and personal. While these systems do use technology, the transactions are still fundamentally driven by human beings on both sides of the machine. This may seem very straightforward, but branches ignore this tip at their own peril. Your members will likely need plenty of time and help adjusting to your new system. Your employees will, too.

At the Bay Shore Branch of NEFCU in Long Island, NY, branch manager Amy Williams-Cardella suggests accounting for plenty of time to assist members and help them feel comfortable. This is also an opportunity for both your in- branch and remote staff to shine.

This content is for CU BUSINESS eMagazine + WEB ACESS and THE TEAM BUILDER (GROUP SUBSCRIPTION) members only.
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